COLONOSCOPY

Colonoscopy involves the examination of the lining of your large intestine (colon) for abnormalities by inserting a thin flexible tube into the anus, which is then gradually advanced into the rectum and colon. The advancement of the colonoscope is controlled by the physician. It has its own light source and lens and allows the doctor to view images on a video monitor.

 

COLONOSCOPY Forms

 

PREPS

 

EGD (UPPER ENDOSCOPY)

EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) involves the examination of the lining of the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). The doctor uses a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope. The endoscope is inserted through the mouth and slowly advanced through the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The instrument has its own light source and lens and allows the doctor to view images on a video monitor.

 

EGD FORMS

 

FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY

Flexible sigmoidoscopy involves the examination of the lining of the rectum and a portion of the colon (large intestine) by inserting a thin flexible tube into the anus, which is then slowly advanced into the rectum and lower part of the colon (sigmoid colon). The sigmoidoscope has its own light source and lens and allows the physician to view images on a video monitor.

 

FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY FORMS

 

THERAPEUTIC ERCP

Therapeutic ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) enables the physicians at Tri-County Gastroenterology to diagnose problems in the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts and pancreas. It is used primarily to diagnose and treat conditions of the bile ducts, including gallstones, inflammatory strictures (scars), leaks and cancer. ERCP combines the use of x-rays and an endoscope, which is a long, flexible, lighted tube. Through the endoscope, the physician can see the inside of the stomach and duodenum, and inject dyes into the ducts in the biliary tree and pancreas so they can be seen on x-rays. If the exam shows a gallstone or narrowing of the ducts, the physician can insert instruments into the scope to remove or relieve the obstruction. Also, tissue samples (biopsy) can be taken for further testing.

 

CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY

Capsule endoscopy involves the examination of the lining of the middle part of the gastrointestinal tract. This includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum). A sensor device will be adhered to the abdomen using adhesive sleeves (similar to tape). A capsule is swallowed and passes naturally through the digestive tract while transmitting video images to a data recorder worn on a belt for approximately 8 hours. At the end of the procedure, the data recorder is removed and the images of the small bowel will be put on a computer screen for the physician to review.

 

CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY FORMS